Energy on demand

Energy on demand

Fusion powers the sun and the stars, where gravity compresses hydrogen gas to the temperatures required for fusion. The challenge for fusion energy is how to create those conditions on Earth in a controlled way that can be used to provide power. Fusion occurs when atoms are heated to very high temperatures, causing them to collide at high velocity and fuse together.

When two light nuclei collide to form a heavier nucleus the process releases a large amount of energy. The most practical fusion reaction uses isotopes of hydrogen named “deuterium” and “tritium”. These can be extracted from seawater and derived from lithium, both in abundant supply. There is enough fusion fuel on earth to power the planet for hundreds of millions of years.

Fusion has the unique capability to provide utility-scale energy on-demand wherever it is needed, making it an excellent complement for intermittent renewables and battery storage. Combined, these technologies make for a practical energy portfolio that mitigates climate change while driving economic prosperity.

Advantages of fusion

Clean

Fusion produces zero greenhouse gas emissions, emitting only helium as exhaust. It also requires less land than other renewable technologies.

Safe

Fusion energy is inherently safe, with zero possibility of a meltdown scenario and no long lived waste.

Abundant

There is enough fusion fuel to power the planet for hundreds of millions of years. A fusion power plant runs on deuterium and tritium, isotopes which can be extracted from seawater and derived from lithium.

On Demand

Fusion can produce energy on-demand, and is not affected by weather. Because it is also safe and produces no pollution, a fusion power plant can be located close to where it is required.

The world’s population is expected to grow to 9 billion by 2040, driving global demand for electricity up by 45%¹. Meeting this demand with the technologies available today will require that fossil fuels remain a primary means of electricity generation. To sustain economic growth while at the same time overcoming climate change, we need to develop sources of energy that are emission-free, safe, globally available and economically viable.

Fusion has the unique capability to provide utility-scale energy on-demand wherever it is needed, making it an excellent complement for intermittent renewables and battery storage. Combined, these technologies make for a practical energy portfolio that mitigates climate change while driving economic prosperity.

Source:
GeneralFusion.com

Another form of nuclear energy known as fusion, which joins atoms of cheap and abundant hydrogen, can produce essentially limitless supplies of power without creating lots of radioactive waste.

Fusion has powered the sun for billions of years. Yet despite decades of effort, scientists and engineers have been unable to generate sustained nuclear fusion here on Earth. In fact, it’s long been joked that fusion is 50 years away, and will always be.

But now it looks as if the long wait for commercial fusion power may be coming to an end — and sooner than in half a century.

Leading the charge

One of the brightest hopes for controlled nuclear fusion, the giant ITER reactor at Cadarache in southeastern France, is now on track to achieve nuclear fusion operation in the mid- to late-2040s, says Dr. William Madia, a former director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory who led an independent review of the ITER project in 2013.

Construction of the ITER reactor — a doughnut-shaped vacuum chamber known as a “tokamak” that spans more than 60 feet — recently passed the halfway point.

Source:
NBC News

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Energy on demand
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